Thursday, January 12, 2012

Woodland Wildflowers-Part 1

Last spring I visited two Forest Preserves here in my area. I am a transplanted Illinoisian and having read and seen them on fellow bloggers' posts prompted me to see them in their native habitat. I grow a few of these wildflowers myself and seeing them in the forest floor is breathtaking.

Trillium recurvatum


Trillium recurvatum



Podophyllum peltatum



A colony of P. peltatum.









Arisaema triphyllum with its two variants, the all-green form and the maroon stemmed form or maybe they are two separate species.



Polygonatum



Smilacina racemosa



Claytonia



Claytonia



Convallaria majalis


I do not know what these plants are. Does anybody knows the ID?

One thing that I am looking forward to in spring is to see these wildflowers again.

6 comments:

Vicent L. said...

Beautiful tiny flowers!

Andrea said...

Hi Lily, it's good you have access to some forest like this. Those Arisaema and Podophyllum looks like our Amorphophallus campanulatus here. No wonder they are both in the Araceae family, what they call aroids. So they have tubers or swelling roots for food storage too. But they might be invasives.

PlantPostings said...

Some of my favorites, too, and most grow in the woods beyond my garden. I'm not sure what the last one is, but I think I've seen it before! I'm hoping I'll discover even more Trillium varieties here this year. They are incredible, but they don't bloom very long.

Lily said...

Vicent,

Yes they are. Thanks for stopping by.

Lily said...

Andrea,

The 'woods' are open to everybody. Some has business hours. There are a few more that I wanted to visit in the spring, the ones with the walking trails.

I don't think these plants are invasive.

Yes they are in the same family as the ones you mentioned. Zantedeschia and Sauromatum included and a lot more out there that I do not know about.

Lily said...

Beth,
If you dicover a different variety of trillium in your 'neck of the woods', please do make a post. :) Even with their short life cycles, these spring ephemerals are a delight to see when they come up in spring. I love them!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...